Wondering Leads to Learning

Can you remember the last time you had a chance to simply sit and allow your wind to wander? If you can’t remember, now’s the time to try it.  Have a look at our video about wondering and open the doors to your thoughts.

The next time you schedule a professional conversation with colleagues, take some time to celebrate wondering.

You might want to begin with, “Why are most pencils yellow?” (no Google searches, just wonder about possible reasons)

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Begin the conversation with a shared reading of Chris Bodenner’s “There Is a Creative Purpose to Daydreaming, Even Boredom”.  Bodenner’s thoughts remind us of Wittgenstein’s words, “the key to thinking is the three B’s: bed, bath, and bus. In other words, we can actually think when we’re unfocused, unconcentrated, or even semi-conscious.” A wandering mind allows us to wonder; wondering can have a powerful impact on thinking; and thinking has a powerful impact on learning.

Wondering is about considering possibilities and what’s possible about impossibilities. Wondering creates a web of the known that provides various pathways to the new. So, why not explore one of those new pathways? Take some time to work with your colleagues to create a group illustration Albert Einstein’s quote:  “The most beautiful emotion we can experience is the mysterious. It is the power of all true art and science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead.”

Segueing from Albert Einstein to the folks at Beyond the Apple is a bit of a stretch, but check out some of our “I Wonder” questions with your professional colleagues and your students? Go to: Beyond the Apple’s I Wonder Why Questions.

We don’t often picture the Wall Street or Bay Street gang taking time to wonder, but Jeff Hoffman knows the truth about wondering –  spend some time viewing Hoffman’s TEDxWall Street video, The Power of Wonder with your colleagues.

To finish up, here’s some research on the power of wondering:

The Wonder Approach to Learning by Catherine L’Ecuver. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 06 October 2014 |

For more professional conversations about education, please visit:Beyond the Apple . . . Reframing Conversations in Education or contact us at Beyondtheapplecontact@gmail.com
 

About Beyond The Apple

Beyond the Apple provides everything a Professional Learning Community needs! Designed to follow Beyond the Apple's Tenets of Adult Education, our videos re-ignite the excitement of professional conversations among educators in the classroom, university, colleges and professional training. Our free teaching and learning resources provide a follow up with more information that is current, research based and practical.
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3 Responses to Wondering Leads to Learning

  1. Pingback: Using “old stuff” to develop questioning: Part 1 | Beyond the Apple

  2. Pingback: Using “old stuff” Part 2: Searching for information | Beyond the Apple

  3. Pingback: Using Old Stuff Part 3: Making comparisons | Beyond the Apple

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