A Student’s Self Assessment of Listening

Here’s Beyond the Apple’s video about teaching students how to listen:

When our students sit up straight, look at the speaker, be silent, and keep hands still and visible,  we assume through their posture that our students are listening.

But no . . . effective listening just ain’t that easy.

Yes, some students use “the posture of listening” to truly engage in a learning situation, but:

Some students quickly learn this is a way to “look studious”. They also know that this illusion of engagement reaps teacher praise.

Some students assume the posture of listening but don’t connect the posture of listening with the process of listening – in other words, they hear the words, but do not make meaning beyond the most superficial of levels.

Some students listen best in a relaxed posture, with eyes that alternate between focused on the speaker and roaming around the classroom.

So rather than focusing on teaching the posture of listening, let’s focus on teaching students how to develop and use the active process of listening.

Like all successful lessons, lessons in listening build on what the students know. Beyond the Apple’s Self Assessment of Listening for Students provides an opportunity for students to reflect on their listening. (Feel free to alter the wording of the questions to match the age and language structures of the class.)

Once the self -assessment is complete, discuss the results with the individual student. Look for patterns of responses among the class and develop listening lessons that build listening into every lesson.

Beyond the Apple’s Student Self Assessment of Listening

Think about what each question is asking. Put a dot at a place that’s closest to your answer. For example:

_______________________._________________________________________

Most of the time                         Sometimes                                         Not very often

This dot shows the answer is closer to sometime than most of the time.

  1. Do you look at the person who is speaking?

__________________________________________________________________

Most of the time                         Sometimes                                         Not very often

  1. Do you make a picture in your mind about what the person is saying?

__________________________________________________________________

Most of the time                         Sometimes                                         Not very often

  1. Do you keep your mind on what the person is saying?

__________________________________________________________________

Most of the time                         Sometimes                                         Not very often

  1. Do you stay calm even if the person who is speaking seems angry?

__________________________________________________________________

Most of the time                         Sometimes                                         Not very often

  1. If you want to say something, do you wait until the person is finished speaking?

__________________________________________________________________

Most of the time                         Sometimes                                         Not very often

  1. Does you nod your head to show the speaker that you were listening?

__________________________________________________________________

Most of the time                         Sometimes                                         Not very often

  1. Do you ask questions if you don’t understand?

__________________________________________________________________

Most of the time                         Sometimes                                         Not very often

(adapted from Critchley Charlton, B. Engaging the Disengaged. Markham, ON: Pembroke 2010

For more about effective listening, click here.

For more professional conversations about education, please visit:Beyond the Apple . . . Reframing Conversations in Education or contact us at Beyondtheapplecontact@gmail.com

About Beyond The Apple

Beyond the Apple provides everything a Professional Learning Community needs! Designed to follow Beyond the Apple's Tenets of Adult Education, our videos re-ignite the excitement of professional conversations among educators in the classroom, university, colleges and professional training. Our free teaching and learning resources provide a follow up with more information that is current, research based and practical.
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